<

Goldman Sacks the Laughs

October 11, 2017 12:00 pm0 commentsViews: 12

Julie-GoldmanJulie Goldman knows how to get straight to the point, which is to make you laugh. The comedian and Provincetown favorite has appeared on wildly varied shows like The Sopranos, RuPaul’s Drag U, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and The Big Gay Sketch Show, which gave her her big break. She took a few moments to reflect on why Boston is such a great comedy city, what working for the late Joan Rivers was like, pounding the pavement in Provincetown to get an audience, and how much she loves Ricky Martin.

Provincetown Magazine: You’re a native Bostonian, a city with a reputation for being a bit icy and stuffy. But it also has a significant comedy scene and star studded legacy. What’s Boston really like as a city when it comes to getting laughs?

Julie Goldman: I grew up in Lexington, which is 20 minutes outside of Boston. My parents grew up in Boston proper. I never found people to be icy, and whenever I hear that Boston accent I’m like instantaneously happy. I love it. Like, love!  Abrasive. Sure.  Blunt. Yup.  But also so funny, so entertaining, so colorful. We don’t have thick accents so I’m always attracted to people who have them. Boston in the heyday was vibrant for comedy for sure, and I think it’s that blue-collar flare that probably set that comedy fire.  Boston has a pretty controversial and dynamic history, and I think what can come out of that is a lot of humor.  It was so exciting going to all the clubs and being around that kind of fire. It was certainly a heavy straight, white, boys’ club, but within those walls I learned a lot, and I think it helped me build a comedy armor and, dare I say, even flamed my rage. And all that has come in pretty handy throughout the years.

PM: One of Joan Rivers’ last performances was here in Provincetown. What was it like working with her as a writer on Fashion Police?

JG: Joan Rivers was the consummate “Jewish mother,” and I am so grateful I had the opportunity to just be in her atmosphere. My first day on Fashion Police, we walked into the kitchen of Melissa’s house (cause that’s where we pitched the jokes), and she said,“Welcome to the worst job you will ever have. Make sure you eat.”  There was a full food spread, Jewish style, and I just thought, “Oh, Yes.  Yes. I’m at home.”  Fully negative but wants to feed you and take care of you.  She was competitive and challenging and working for her was tough and the best joke writing education I ever had. I wish she had lived. I think she had so much more to teach us.

PM: You play gigs all over the country. What is Provincetown like for a comedian and how does it compare to other locales?

JG: Provincetown is so fun because it’s an awesome cross section of New England, and of course people come from all over the world. For performers it’s also extremely competitive and challenging as there’s 5,000,000 shows on a one-mile long street, and so the grind can be somewhat daunting. I think we all just roll the dice and hope people show up. But when they do, it’s magic. There something about Ptown that really brings the best out in people (and sometimes the devil, too—let’s be honest) because people feel free and they’re on vacation and just looking to have fun and let loose.  I love it.

PM:  You just finished working on the film Boy Band with Gilbert Gottfried and Jerry O’Connell. What’s the film about and when does it come out? And true confessions…do you have a favorite boy band as a guilty pleasure?

JG: Boy Band directed and written by the Levinson Brothers was so fun!  We shot in Dayton, Ohio, and I wish it was a TV series so we could all keep working together. Basically it’s about an aging boy band that tries to have a renaissance, and I don’t want to give anything away, but basically they find themselves in a recording studio learning it’s the end of the world.  I play a lesbian pizza delivery girl (dream role). You know, your basic boy band comedy.  My favorite boy band of all time is Menudo. The Ricky Martin years.  Hands down.

PM: Your show Trigger Happy that you’re bringing to Provincetown seems charged and inspired by the sh*t-storm we are living in right now. How are you coping with all of the political and cultural chaos?

JG: That’s the perfect way of saying it! It absolutely is!  I’m coping with alcohol, drugs, and constantly yelling on stage about how I’m coping. No, I mean, it’s sort of true.  But basically, I’m so grateful I have comedy because it really is a coping mechanism. To be able to vent, and rage on stage is really all I could ask for—aside from starting an all gay/lady vigilante group—it’s really the best medicine. I love coming to Provincetown and I hope people find the time to come and laugh and rage with me. My show is at 6 p.m., so it’s a weird time, but at least it’s early enough you can come get your buzz on with me, then go have dinner, and you still have a whole night ahead of you!

Julie Goldman, Trigger Happy, Crown and Anchor, Provincetown, MA, 247 Commercial St., Provincetown Thursday, October 12 through Saturday, October 14 at 6 p.m. For tickets ($25), got to the box office or visit onlyatthecrown.com. For more information call 508.487.1430.